Instamatic Days - Street Photography

Rain by hikkko - [Editor’s choice]
ZoomInfo
Camera

RICOH GR DIGITAL 3

ISO

1600

Aperture

f/2.8

Exposure

1/110th

Focal Length

6mm

Rain by hikkko - [Editor’s choice]

Untitled by irotari - [Editor’s choice]
winter street
ZoomInfo
Camera

Canon EOS 5D

ISO

200

Aperture

f/4

Exposure

1/200th

Focal Length

200mm

Untitled by irotari - [Editor’s choice]
winter street

      ““Anyone from outside is seen as an intruder, especially when you have a camera with you…”

via British Journal of Photography -

“Portuguese forcados lie somewhere between the bullriders of the Americas and the bloodier bullfighters of Spain,” says Eduardo Leal, who is graduating this year with a master’s degree in photojournalism and documentary photography from the London College of Communication. “Unlike in Spain, where the bull is stabbed to death if the matador wins the contest, the forcados wrestle the animal [its horns are capped] with their bare hands as a display of determination and bravura.”
Leal embarked on the project in a bid to rediscover his country, he says. Having lived away from Portugal for some years, exploring its traditions would, he reasoned, allow him to get back to his roots. “I don’t support bullfighting, but forcados have always captured my attention. I remember stopping in front of the television to look at these crazy men wrestling bulls and wondered what motivated them.”
Wanting to better understand this tradition, the 34-year-old set about fostering a relationship with a group of forcados; he was unable to take pictures straight away as he had to spend time getting to know the group. They are like a family and it takes time to gain their trust, he explains. “Anyone from outside is seen as an intruder, especially when you have a camera with you… I hung out with them and barely took any pictures, but I always carried a camera. I went to every bullfight, meeting and dinner, and slowly they started to see me as one of them. It was only then that the project really started to flow.”


By Simon Bainbridge

      A project that touches on the human need for common belief systems

via British Journal of Photography -

“For the past three years at college, my photography has been narrative-based and focused on the merging of reality and fiction,” says Gemma Dagger, who has recently completed a BA in photography at City of Glasgow College. “A previous project looked at Alpine folk traditions and occult philosophy. I suppose the Maryhill Peoples Group and Community Hall project was a continuation of my need to create these odd worlds.” For this series Dagger created a fictional group, which she photographed in a local community hall in Glasgow. Inspired by television programmes about hypnosis, as well as religious shows and occult rituals, Dagger explores ritualistic behaviour and the various constructs and forms of religion by instructing her subjects (mostly friends, who volunteer to take part) to pose in specific ways. The project touches on the breakdown of community, group mentality and the human need for a belief system, she explains. “I wanted to create a fake construct – Maryhill Peoples Group and Community Hall – and produce a small pamphlet of images and words as a memorandum to this secret society. The composition of the images had to be precise and symmetrical to reflect the structured nature of ritual and worship,” she adds. “I always arrive at shoots with everything storyboarded so I can give most of my attention to directing my subjects. I had already imagined these very austere, detached scenes.” Dagger researched the work of writers such as French sociologist and philosopher Émile Durkheim and French Marxist theorist Guy Debord by way of preparation, and also took inspiration from cults and religious sects she came across during her research. “Durkheim proposed that our first and foremost constructs for understanding the world have their origins in religion,” says Dagger. “Debord suggests that the reliance we once put on religion, and the control it had over us, is now replaced by the all-consuming spectacle of mass marketing. I wanted to use photography to create my own interpretation of this secularisation of society by constructing symbolic situations, which depict almost surreal versions of reality.”


By Simon Bainbridge

      Daniel Blau 5 Under 30 exhibition enters final days

via British Journal of Photography -

The competition, now in its second year, recognises emerging photographers under the age of 30. This year’s winners are: Matan Ashkenazy, Oliver Eglin, Daewoong Kim, Ruidi Mu, and Sofia Valiente.

Matan Ashkenazy documents the physical border areas between Switzerland, Germany, Italy, Lichtenstein and France, while in his series Markings, Oliver Eglin photographs Ficus macrophylla trees in Sicily that have been engraved by visitors.

Royal College of Art graduate Daewoong Kim explores his Korean identity and family ties by photographing items of food, while Ruidi Mu makes images of calabash, a vine, which is an ancient symbol for health and luck in Chinese culture.

Sofia Valiente documents life in Miracle Village, an impoverished area of Palm Beach County, Florida.

“We strongly believe that young photographers need to be supported as they are the future of this marvelous discipline,” says a spokesperson from Daniel Blau. “We organise this annual competition in order to help emerging artists gain recognition through our gallery.

“The standard of work this year has been great. We received many submissions and it was difficult to select only five but finally we chose these projects. From still life, to portraits and landscapes, this is a very diverse show.”

A selection of work by the winning photographers is on show at Daniel Blau gallery in London until 31 July.

For more information visit www.5under30.com.

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By Gemma Padley

      Magnum Photos to run documentary photography course

via British Journal of Photography -

Photography agency Magnum Photos has partnered with London College of Communication to present a three-week long course specialising in documentary photography.

The course, which runs from 1 to 21 August in Elephant & Castle in south London, will be led by Magnum photographers Chris Steele-Perkins and Stuart Franklin.

Focusing on the theme, A Sense of Place, photographers will learn about the conveyance of a narrative in relation to geography, identity and culture.

The course includes tuition and technical guidance from the course leaders, lectures, daily assignments on location in London, advice on book design, sequencing and editing, and individual and group critique sessions.

Daily classes are complimented by evening lectures given by Magnum photographers and LCC staff.

Participants will also spend a weekend at the Magnum Print Room, networking, and learning the mechanics of the photography business.

At the end of the three-weeks, participants will take part in a graduation party where they will digitally showcase their work to an audience of industry professionals and members of the public.

The course aims to give participants an insight into the history of documentary photography, to encourage them to engage in critical debates in and around aspects of contemporary photographic practice, and to continue to develop essential skills in writing, editing and making work for different audiences.

For more information and to book a place, click here

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By Gemma Padley

      Laurent Nivalle: Le Mans Classic

via The Leica Camera - Held every two years, Le Mans Classic offers a great retrospective of the 24 Hours of Le Mans. For the third consecutive time, Leica Camera France participated in this great event and had the honor of hosting Laura Kaufmann and her brother Max Kaufmann. Their presence was greatly appreciated by our customers. For the occasion, […]
By Leica Internet Team - Leica Cameras

      Media Space appoints head of photography

via British Journal of Photography -

The Science Museum Group has named Kate Bush as its head of photography.

In her new role, Bush, who was the former head of art galleries at London’s Barbican Centre, will lead a programme of photography exhibitions for Media Space, the Science Museum’s new photography and art gallery, and the National Media Museum in Bradford.

She will also be responsible for the development of a major touring programme bringing the National Photography Collection to a wider national and international audience.

“In luring Kate to our group of museums, we are uniting the most inspiring advocate for photography I’ve met with one of the greatest photography collections in the world,” says Ian Blatchford, director of the Science Museum Group in a press statement. “Media Space has made an excellent start in raising the profile of the National Photography Collection; the next step is to ensure our exhibitions become an integral part of the top league touring circuit.”

The new role will involve forging strong relationships throughout the international photography community and securing key temporary exhibitions for the two museums in London and Bradford. Bush will also oversee an active acquisitions plan.

She will take up the newly created role on 28 July.

Greg Hobson, current curator of photographs at the National Media Museum, will continue in his role.

“I am thrilled to be joining a museum with such an exciting and energetic vision for the future,” says Bush. “This is a once-in-a lifetime opportunity to create a world-class programme of photography exhibitions in the beautiful new galleries in London, as well as Bradford and internationally. I can see tremendous scope in this role to develop new audiences and new approaches to the exhibition and study of photography. It’s an extraordinary collection which demands to be better known and I am looking forward to working with the teams to achieve that.”

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By Gemma Padley